1 - 10 of 20   Next 10 >  ::  JOIN  ::  Forum  ::  Info  ::  Next Ring  
The GWR WebRing - The GWR WebRing is for all sites related to the Great Western Railway (UK, absorbed pre-grouping companies and BR Wester

  Forums     Market     Login   Signup



The GWR WebRing

Listed in:
Home > Business & Finance > Transportation > Trains and Railroads > Railway Enthusiasts
Manager: rjkyte2
The GWR WebRing is for all sites related to the Great Western Railway (UK, absorbed pre-grouping companies and BR Western Region. Both prototype and modelling sites are welcome. All GWR related websites are welcome, subject to quliafication to the conditions laid down on the Ringmaster Site.

 

Sponsored Links


   Richard Kyte's "Railways of..." Preview 1 review(s) — Go
Contains a section on the "Railways of the Forest of Dean", as well as being the ringmaster site of the GWR webring.
   Bishops Nympton, a 7mm Great Western Branch line. Preview Go
This is my O Gauge model railway of a fictitious branch line set in the hills somewhere in North Devon. The opportunities at Bishops Nympton were recognieed in the late 1800 and this branch line was built to serve the community and this model depicts the operation of the station during the early 1930s
   The Disk and Crossbar Pages Preview Go
Come look at the Great Western Railway (GWR) in the days when traffic was controlled with the disk and crossbar signal, approximately 1838 to 1874. It was a time of wonder, a time of social change, a time of legends, a time of heroes a time when a man who drove a locomotive from London to Exter and back in a single day was looked upon much as a lunar astronaut is now.


   A short history of Britain's broad gauge railways Preview Go
In 1835, in the early days of railway construction, the Great Western Railway was born. The original main line ran between London and Bristol, a distance of 117 miles (187 kms), which was opened throughout in June 1841. What made the Great Western Railway unusual was the choice of gauge. Instead of building the railway to what became the British standard gauge of 4ft 8½ins, the track was laid to a gauge of 7ft 0¼ins (“broad gauge”). Over the following 25 years, many of the railways connecting to the Great Western Railway built their lines with broad gauge track, resulting in a network of broad gauge railways extending from London to Bristol, Wolverhampton, South Wales, Weymouth, and westward through the counties of Somerset, Devon and Cornwall to reach Penzance. At its peak in 1868, broad gauge railways covered 1,070 miles
   THE UK Model Shop Directory Preview Go
The largest resource for British Outline Model Railway enthusiasts providing a Model Shop directory with A-Z Maps, Suppliers directory, Events Calendar, Societies listings and links.
   March Web Preview Go
News and information about the West Somerset Railway, GWR King Class 4-6-0 6024 King Edward I ,UK Main line steam hauled railtours,and home site for the GWR email list.
   Steam Archive Preview Go
One of Britain's Largest Private Collections of Steam Railway Photographs, Containing Approx. 10,000 Images Ranging From 1930's to 1968.
   GWR 7202 Boiler Restoration Preview Go
The restoration of the GWR Class 72xx No 7202's boiler.Work progress and details on various boiler fittings.Photos of the work and fittings.
   Great Western Society - Bristol Group Preview Go
The Bristol Group of the Great Western Society arranges events in the Bristol area and is also responsible for the Signal and Telegraph Department at the Society's main base at Didcot in Oxfordshire.
   Lambourn Station Preview Go
Lambourn Station is a termini station once on the GWR. Closed in 1975 I hope to re-create it as my new exhibition layout in EM gauge set in 1930-1914






Contact Us | Copyright © 2001-2016 WebRing®, Inc. Terms of Service - Help - Privacy Policy